Freshman Academy Ninth Grade

Ms. Emily Quinn

English 9

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Listening Practice


Explanation of Listening Section of Exam

  • This section of your exam will be on Monday, January 14, 2008 and will count for 25% of your total exam grade. 

  • You will listen to a passage twice, taking notes each time.  Then, you will answer multiple-choice questions based on the information given in the passage you heard.

  • You will be able to use your notes to help you answer the questions, but you will not be able to look at the passage, have any portion repeated, or see the questions you will have to answer beforehand.  Each reading will be uninterrupted.

  • If you didn't hear something the first time the passage was read, be sure to listen for that information during the second reading.

  • (On Thursday, this process will be repeated, but with a different listening passage than the one you hear on Monday.  You will have to use the information in your notes to help you write the essay.)

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Click on the following to find:

Some samples that you can practice with

A list of tips/strategies that you can use to increase your likelihood of success on that particular section

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Some samples for practice

*Listen to a passage twice and take notes on it both times using a T-chart (described below in the Tips/Strategies).  Then, try to answer the corresponding multiple-choice questions.  You will not be able to look at the multiple-choice questions before listening to the passage.

    First Example: Dust Bowl (June 2002)

    Second Example: Leatherback Turtles (January 2002)

    Third Example: Influenza Epidemic (August 2002)

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Tips/Strategies

 

  • The first time you take notes, focus on listening and understanding the main idea of what is being read.  The notes you take the first time through should be on the key information more than specific details. 

  • Use a T-chart to help you organize your information:

    1. The first time you hear a passage, write your notes in the left column of a T-chart and leave space between ideas. 

    2. Before the second reading of the passage, check over your notes to try to

      • Fill in any information you didn't while listening

      • Make note of any information you need to listen specifically for.

    3. During the second reading, write your notes in the right column lined up with the corresponding information in the left side. 

    4. Fill in the relevant details as the passage is read a second time.  This will save you a lot of time and serve as a check that you got all of the needed information. 

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Sample Listening Passages

Click on the ear () to listen to the passage


First Example: Dust Bowl Listening Passage, taken from the June 2002 Regents Exam and read by Ms. Quinn

Dust Bowl Listening Example

Listen once, taking notes on the main ideas in the left column of your T-chart.  Then, give yourself about five minutes, to look over your notes to fill in any information and make note of specific information to listen for during the second reading. 

 

DO NOT LOOK AT THE MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS UNTIL AFTER YOU HAVE LISTENED FOR THE SECOND TIME!

 

 

 

 

Dust Bowl Multiple-Choice Questions

 

 

 

 

 

 


Second Example: Leatherback Turtles Listening Passage, taken from the January 2002 Regents Exam and read by Mrs. Geiselmann

Leatherback Turtles Listening Example   

Listen once, taking notes on the main ideas in the left column of your T-chart.  Then, give yourself about five minutes, to look over your notes to fill in any information and make note of specific information to listen for during the second reading. 

 

DO NOT LOOK AT THE MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS UNTIL AFTER YOU HAVE LISTENED FOR THE SECOND TIME!

 

 

 

 

Leatherback Turtles Multiple-Choice Questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Third Example: Influenza Epidemic Listening Passage, taken from the August 2002 Regents Exam and read by Mrs. Geiselmann

Influenza Epidemic Listening Example    

Listen once, taking notes on the main ideas in the left column of your T-chart.  Then, give yourself about five minutes, to look over your notes to fill in any information and make note of specific information to listen for during the second reading. 

 

DO NOT LOOK AT THE MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS UNTIL AFTER YOU HAVE LISTENED FOR THE SECOND TIME!

 

 

 

Influenza Epidemic Multiple-Choice Questions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Multiple-Choice Questions

 

Click on your answer to see if you are correct...

Red=Wrong Answer, Green=Correct Answer

 


Dust Bowl Multiple-Choice Questions:

1. The speaker implies that in 1931 the attitude of Southern Plains Farmers toward the future was one of:

1. acceptance    2. curiosity   

3. impatience    4. optimism   

 

2. According to the speaker, one condition that contributed to the disappearance of topsoil was a lack of:

1. moisture    2. sunlight 

3. air   4. heat  

 

3. The speaker implies that when Dust Bowl conditions first appeared, the government's reaction was one of:

1. distrust   2. fear   

3. indifference    4. anger   

 

4. The speaker indicates that as a consequence of Hugh Bennett's arguments, farmers began to:

 

1. install irrigation systems   2. change planting methods

3.obtain government loans    4. leave their farms

 

5. The speaker implies that soil conservation techniques were responsible for an increase in:

 

1. available moisture    2. harvested wheat   

3. useable topsoil    4. Plains settlers   

 

6. According to the speaker, the Dust Bowl taught farmers to view the land as:

 

1. fragile   2.friendly   

3. powerless    4. profitable   

 

 

Second Listening Passage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Leatherback Turtles Multiple-Choice Questions:

 

1. The speaker implies that ultrasound tests on sea turtles are becoming

 

1. dangerous    2. lucrative   

3. controversial    4. commonplace   

 

2. The principal purpose of the research at Playa Grande is to determine the most effective

 

1. conservationall measures    2. technological procedures  

3.  medical tests     4. feeding patterns  

 

3. According to the speaker, what characteristics make the leatherbacks unique among sea turtles?

 

1. behavior and personality    2. speed and energy  

3. size and age    4. color and patterning  

 

4. According to the speaker, leatherback products used by humans include

 

1. leather   2. oil  

3. shell  4. bone  

 

5. The primary purpose of the speech is most likely to

 

1. protest current practice    2. challenge a point of view 

3. evaluate multiple perspectives    4. educate the public

 

6. At the end of the speech the speaker indicates that declaring Playa Grande as a national park is a direct result of

 

1. media exposure    2. Internet communication  

3. scientific research    4. economic need 

 

 

Third Listening Passage

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Influenza Epidemic Multiple-Choice Questions:

1. According to the speaker, the influenza of 1918 spread by means of

 

1. water-born contaminents    2. undercooked food   

3. insect bites    4. air-born particles    

 

2. The speaker implies that the war effort affected the epidemic by

 

1. increasing the chance of exposure        2. decreasing health care funds 

3. restricting the flow of information    4. undermining the public confidence

 

3. In the sentence, "In Philadelphia, 200,000 [people] sardined in the streets," the word "sardined" emphasizes the crowds

 

1. destination    2.mood  

      3. density    4. motivation   

 

4. According to the speaker, laws requiring people to wear masks in public did not stop the epidemic because

 

1.they helped to spread the virus   2. they allowed the virus to pass through

3. people would not wear them    4. people did not know about them

 

5. According to the speaker, how did the influenza of 1918 differ from previous flu outbreaks?

 

1. its victims were primarily young adults 

2. it occurred primarily during the spring

3. it received less attention from the government

4. its symptoms included fever and headache 

 

6. The speaker implies that troop ships were hazardous because of

 

1. poor maintenance   2. low morale  

3. limited supplies   4. crowded quarters   

  

 

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FANG Teachers

 

Please note that this site is continually under construction.  All information on this site is meant only as a guide and may be altered.

If you have any questions or comments concerning the FANG website, please contact Ms. Quinn at: EQuinn@wccsk12.org.

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